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20120901
20120930
STATION
SFGTV2 11
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Sep 24, 2012 6:00am PDT
's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
SFGTV2
Sep 3, 2012 6:07am PDT
of the first sewer systems were on the east coast of the united states, often in places that already had developed a citywide water supply system. sullivan: in 1630, boston was basically three mountains, there were very steep hills. waste would run down quickly and dump into the harbor. and the tide would carry most of it away. well, this worked well for a while. the problem was, as boston wanted to expand, it started filling in the mudflats. the water could come rushing down the hill, it would hit the flat area and slow down. at high tide, it couldn't get out at all. it got so bad that the city took over, 'cause the city has a responsibility to protect its citizens. boston built the first modern sewer system in the united states. ours was completed between 1877 and 1884. with this wonderful new sewer system, we were taking our filth and moving it out to the ocean. of course, all of this was untreated. in the 1960s, we were still pumping all of our sewage out to moon island, untreated. we would get swimmers here, never knowing, in the middle of summer, why you would have a cold. well, we
SFGTV2
Sep 12, 2012 11:00pm PDT
of recovery. his city is a model for the rest of the united states to emulate. the honorable edwin lee. [applause] ç>> thank you. next time i see mayor willie brown, i will remind him it was fema. [laughter] we will have to name a doorway in addition to the staircase. thank you, everyone, for coming to san francisco. it is a pleasure to receive new and open up our house and to have you discuss, plan, and create relationships perhaps you do not have today among the federal and local police -- agencies working together on recovery. our city has been working hard. we have seen the future. the future is that if we're not prepared, it will not be our future. i got a glimpse of that some years ago when staff and i went down to new orleans. we have begun to realize the devastation was the result of things that could have been done there are national lessons to be learned from any major disaster across our country, what we could have done better. when i visited there those years ago, we stood at the night éovardç -- at the ninthç ward. in addition to taking pictures, we just stood there
SFGTV2
Sep 7, 2012 11:30am PDT
today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much o
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)